Oppo F7 Review

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Oppo F7

Oppo F7 Review

 

Oppo F7 design

We’ve more often than not been content with the assemble quality and outline of Oppo’s F-arrangement cell phones, yet the organization is adopting another strategy with the F7. Rather than the typical metal backboard, Oppo is utilizing an all-plastic body. On one hand, the telephone is light at only 158g, however, on the other, it doesn’t feel exceptionally premium any longer. Oppo has attempted to cure this with a reflexive layer of paint for the sides, which looks okay on the Diamond Black and Platinum Silver renditions, however less on the Solar Red variation that we had for audit.

On the back, Oppo has utilized a bit of polymer composite material. In our underlying impressions of the Oppo F7, we found the back board to scratch pretty effectively, however, this wasn’t an issue with the retail unit that we got for audit. All things considered, it’s not impenetrable to scratches, and applying slight weight with even a SIM launch instrument caused an obvious scraped spot.

On the front, we have a 6.23-inch in-cell IPS show with a determination of 1080×2280 pixels, and Gorilla Glass 5. Because of the score at the highest point of the screen, the Oppo F7 falls into the 19:9 perspective proportion classification. The organization has utilized this space keenly, which we’ll get into in the following segment. The show doesn’t bend along the edges, there’s still somewhat of a button at the base. Inside the score, Oppo has prepared for the earpiece, front camera, and a few sensors, however, the notice LED has been dropped. This telephone ships with a screen monitor preinstalled, which is very irritating as the edges aren’t lined up with the edges of the show, so it rubs against your fingertips each time you attempt to pull down the warnings shade or swipe from the sides.

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Oppo F7

The buttons are easy to reach. At the bottom, we have a single speaker grille, a Micro-USB port, and a 3.5mm headphone socket. The speaker grille gets blocked by your palm easily when you’re playing a game or watching a video in landscape mode. We’re still disappointed about the lack of a Type-C port here, and we reached out to Oppo for an explanation as to why this decision was made. In an emailed statement, the company said: “A large number of users are using the current USB ports so this would be more convenient for users”.

The SIM tray is placed on the right and can hold two Nano-SIMs and a microSD card (up to 256GB). There’s a fingerprint sensor at the back, along with a single camera. In the Oppo F7 box, you get a 10W charger, a USB cable, a silicone case, and a headset.

Oppo F7 specifications, software, and features

The Oppo F7 uses the new MediaTek Helio P60 octa-core SoC, which is the same one used in the Oppo R15. It’s based on ARM’s big.LITTLE architecture, marrying four high-performance ARM Cortex-A73 cores with four power-efficient Cortex-A53 cores. It’s manufactured using a 12nm FinFET fabrication process and has an integrated Mali-G72 MP3 graphics processor. More importantly, though, this SoC also has dedicated AI processing logic which promises more secure facial recognition and real-time HDR, two features that Oppo has implemented in the F7.

For long, MediaTek has generally been associated with low-cost smartphones, although the Helio series has performed much better. The new P60 is actually more powerful than even Qualcomm’s competing Snapdragon 626 and 636 SoCs. We got a score of 135,279 in AnTuTu 7, and 37fps in GFXbench’s T-Rex test.

Oppo F7

The Oppo F7 version that we tested has 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage, but the F7 is also available in a version with 6GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, which is priced at Rs. 26,990. Other specifications include dual-band Wi-Fi 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2, USB-OTG, FM radio, and 4G VoLTE. The F7 also features an ambient light sensor, accelerometer, proximity sensor, Hall sensor, and a gyroscope. There’s a non-removable 3400mAh battery.

The new Oppo F7 ships with Android Oreo 8.1 out of the box, but it’s hard to recognize it with all the customizations that have been made. Oppo’s ColorOS 5.0 UI has some familiar gestures and tweaks from past iterations, along with some new ones. First off, we have to say that we’re not big fans of the new default theme. The icons are unnecessarily chunky and make the UI feel dated. The Theme Store app doesn’t offer many choices, and we only found a couple of options that were good enough to use. Another annoyance with the UI is the fact that you can’t swipe a notification away. Instead, you have to swipe left and hit ‘Delete’, which just adds an unnecessary step to the process.

The fingerprint sensor works well and is quick at authentication. It can also be used for unlocking apps, and a secure space within your phone’s internal storage. Oppo is making a big deal about its new face unlock implementation, which is said to map and recognize 128 points on a registered face. In practice, we found that it worked pretty well, and was quick most of the time.

There’s a ‘raise to wake’ option, and in low light, the screen gets brighter in an attempt to illuminate your face. We weren’t able to fool it with a 2D picture, and it worked even when we had sunglasses on. The latter is possible because the Oppo F7 doesn’t scan your eyes, which makes it slightly less secure. Other phones such as the Vivo V9 require your eyes to be open for face recognition to work.

The Oppo F7 version that we tested has 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage, but the F7 is also available in a version with 6GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, which is priced at Rs. 26,990. Other specifications include dual-band Wi-Fi 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2, USB-OTG, FM radio, and 4G VoLTE. The F7 also features an ambient light sensor, accelerometer, proximity sensor, Hall sensor, and a gyroscope. There’s a non-removable 3400mAh battery.

The new Oppo F7 ships with Android Oreo 8.1 out of the box, but it’s hard to recognize it with all the customizations that have been made. Oppo’s ColorOS 5.0 UI has some familiar gestures and tweaks from past iterations, along with some new ones. First off, we have to say that we’re not big fans of the new default theme. The icons are unnecessarily chunky and make the UI feel dated. The Theme Store app doesn’t offer many choices, and we only found a couple of options that were good enough to use. Another annoyance with the UI is the fact that you can’t swipe a notification away. Instead, you have to swipe left and hit ‘Delete’, which just adds an unnecessary step to the process.

The fingerprint sensor works well and is quick at authentication. It can also be used for unlocking apps, and a secure space within your phone’s internal storage. Oppo is making a big deal about its new face unlock implementation, which is said to map and recognize 128 points on a registered face. In practice, we found that it worked pretty well, and was quick most of the time.

There’s a ‘raise to wake’ option, and in low light, the screen gets brighter in an attempt to illuminate your face. We weren’t able to fool it with a 2D picture, and it worked even when we had sunglasses on. The latter is possible because the Oppo F7 doesn’t scan your eyes, which makes it slightly less secure. Other phones such as the Vivo V9 require your eyes to be open for face recognition to work.

You can ditch the on-screen navigation keys in favor of gestures if you want an iPhone X-like experience. Once enabled, you get little horizontal markers at the bottom of the display as a placeholder. A swipe up takes you to the home screen while swiping upwards and then holding for a few moments brings up the app switcher. You can swipe up from either the left or right edges to go a step back. There are different gesture styles to choose from, depending on your preference.

As we stated earlier, Oppo has implemented some nifty shortcuts that take advantage of the screen space to either side of the notch. If you enable the Fullscreen Multitasking feature, you can access features called Quick Apps and Quick Function. Quick Apps lets you add shortcuts for some apps to the right of the notch, and on the left, there will be controls for beginning a screen recording, taking a screenshot, and toggling DND mode. These can be accessed when the phone is in landscape mode, by swiping inwards from the notch area.

We found that the shortcuts were accessible when watching YouTube videos, and even streaming through apps like Prime Video and Netflix, but not in most of the games we tried (only Asphalt 8: Airborne showed them) and when watching local video files in MX Player or the stock video app. In apps that support it, the Quick Apps feature lets you access apps within a floating window so you can do things like sending a message without exiting the app you’re in. The notch area is also used as to alert you when there’s a background app that’s using the microphone, or if a split-screen app is running in the background.

Security features include a secure keyboard, which renders as an overlay on top of Gboard and is claimed to keep your keystrokes private, although it feels a bit clunky. You can spoof your identifying information such as contacts if apps require permissions to access them in order to work. Kids Space lets you limit the apps your little ones have access to when you hand them the phone.

Oppo Cloud gives you 5GB of free cloud storage for backups, while Game Acceleration is supposed to adjust system resources for better gameplay. You get a tonne of toggle switches in the notifications shade, including shortcuts for Google Now, the camera, screen recording, and Oppo share, which can be used to send files over Wi-Fi to nearby Oppo phones. Stock apps include Oppo’s own app store, a file manager, and an app for migrating data over to another phone.

Oppo F7 performance, cameras, and battery life

The low weight of the Oppo F7 makes it very comfortable to use every day. However, the glossy back and sides make it a major fingerprint magnet so it’s a real pain to keep clean. We’re not big fans of the new design, and we think the older F5 still looks and feels more premium. We didn’t have any trouble with 4G reception and call quality is good in all the areas we tested it in. We’re also happy to report that the F7 runs fairly cool in most use cases. Even when gaming outdoors on a hot day, the back of the phone only got a bit warm at best, which is great.

The speaker doesn’t get too loud when playing media files, but alerts were quite audible. Most of the apps we tested worked well with the 19:9 display. In apps that don’t have native support, you get a little prompt to stretch them to fullscreen. Some of the themes in Oppo’s Theme Store weren’t notch-ready and had alignment issues. In some games, on-screen items can be obscured when running in fullscreen mode.

The headset looks a lot like Apple’s EarPods but they don’t sound all that great. The Oppo F7 has an audio enhancement feature called Real Original Sound developed by Oppo and Dirac. It helps lift the mids and low-end frequencies a bit, but it isn’t very noticeable with the bundled headset. You can also create a custom EQ presets. There’s a Headphones Monitor toggle that is said to provide a “live karaoke experience through the headphones,” but we didn’t find much use for it. The phone handles most popular video and audio codecs, but it struggled to play 4K video files smoothly.

Being an F-series phone, there’s a lot of focus on the front camera of the Oppo F7. Oppo has picked a 25-megapixel Sony sensor, with a f/2.0 aperture. The F7 also boasts of AI Beauty and Sensor HDR capabilities. AI Beauty only works with the front camera and lets the algorithms do the work of judging how much beautification is needed. Most of the time, we found that it worked quite well, but there were instances when it went a bit wrong. You can manually choose the level of beautification too, along with various filters. It also now works with other parts of your body too, like your neck. Sensor HDR gives you a preview of the final shot before it’s actually taken. In practice, it works well with barely any shutter lag. There are some AR stickers too, which are fun to play around with.

Image quality is very good in daytime shots, and the camera manages to retain good detail and color even indoors. The screen flash is fairly effective, and even in low light, we managed to get bright and clear selfies, with little to no noise on our subjects’ faces. There’s a depth effect mode, which does a decent job with edge detection, and the level of blurring is usually managed well. You can even use a palm gesture to take shots.

The back camera has a 16-megapixel sensor with a f/1.8 gap, which figures out how to catch tolerable subtle elements in stills, given there’s adequate light. Centering is brisk amid the day, yet dips a bit in low light. Macros are additionally taken care of well, with pleasantly immersed hues, and similar maintains a degree even in low light. Scenes during the evening lose a touch of detail, and protests out yonder need great definition on the off chance that you zoom in.

The camera application permits 2x zooming (with the exception of in Panorama mode) yet we don’t suggest this as it’s basically simply advanced zoom, in which you miss out on clearness. Master mode gives you a chance to tinker around with the ISO, shade speed, and so on, and you can likewise switch on Ultra HD, which lines four back to back shots into a solitary higher-determination outline (6212×9216 pixels). The Super Vivid flip switch knocks up the differentiation, which is helpful when shooting close-ups of nourishment and so forth, yet it can influence scenes to look fake, particularly when joined with HDR.

Strangely, the telephone doesn’t bolster 4K video recording, as the most extreme determination is 1080p. There’s no electronic adjustment either, so it’s best not to move around an excess of when you shoot. Indeed, even slight handshakes are detectable in the last yield, and even with an adequate light, we saw a touch of center chasing while panning. You don’t get extra modes for video either, for example, moderate movement. The camera application is anything but difficult to utilize and that is on the grounds that the design is intensely propelled by iOS.

Battery life one of Oppo F7’s solid suits, and amid standard use, we experienced no difficulty getting about a day and a half worth of runtime on a solitary charge. With heavier utilization, battery life reduces, yet the Oppo F7 should even now easily last you through an entire day. Charging is somewhat moderate as even with the 10W charger, we just oversaw get to around 23 percent in 30 minutes.

The F7 doesn’t bolster Oppo’s VOOC streak charging standard. We additionally didn’t care for the way that ColorOS doesn’t have a battery use chart, which is normally found in the Settings application. There’s no choice for battery administration in the Phone Manager application either. You get a straightforward Power Saving flip switch, however, there’s no real way to alter that model.

Decision

The Oppo F7 is a decent overhaul over the F5 as far as battery life and SoC execution. The selfie camera is additionally effectively truly outstanding in this present telephone’s value run, and new options like the Sense HDR mode and AI Beauty function admirably more often than not. We’re not huge devotees of the feel as it’s an assignment to keep this telephone looking great. The plastic body additionally takes away the top-notch feeling that most past F-arrangement telephones prided themselves on. ColorOS doesn’t have a sufficiently crisp outline either, and Oppo may have run a bit over the edge with the customizations, which we don’t appreciate. Oppo has utilized the territory around the score well, so it’s not just there for stylish esteem.

Amongst this and the Vivo V9, we’d prescribe the Oppo F7 as it is better as far as battery life, camera quality, and CPU execution. In the event that you require something more element rich, there’s likewise the Moto X4 (Review) at around a similar value, which has much preferable form quality over both the Vivo and Oppo models, and even has waterproofing.